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Great Rides Bikeshare Leading Austin TX and Others to Better Bike Systems

Since our Great Rides Bikeshare record breaking launch in 2015 (awarded nations most rides per bike per day three years running) we’ve met with the leaders of Bikeshare around the country at B-Cycle World and received inquiries and had discussions with cities and Universities over the years. We’ve been open and eager to share our innovative student led, easy access model.
Cool to see Austin TX is another system we’ve worked with that has adopted our model to help reduce campus congestion and add value and their ridership is exploding!
So fun to see our student led, innovative Great Rides Bikeshare model that took us from 2011 – 2014 to develop, gain student support along with strong community sponsors is now helping lead the nations bikeshares toward easier to use and more robust systems.
We’ve been delivering on the demand for sharing economy solutions to reduce transportation costs and congestion and having a positive national impact.
Let’s keep making it a Great Ride!
Mike
Here’s a quote from the article:“Some people were looking at Fargo as if is this an outlier, a one-off,” he said. “I think what we’re showing is, no, if you integrate a campus system with a larger city system — if you remove some of those barriers, this can really work.”
PlacesForBikes helps U.S. communities buil
First in a series of profiles of the Big Jump Project’s 10 focus areas. Central Austin seems to have everything: a massive research university, the world’s biggest annual media festival and one of the country’s strongest local job-creation engines. But when a city sees so much success, it runs …
peopleforbikes.org

Campus bike sharing in the United States seems to have hit a new high water mark on the flagship campus of the University of Texas.
Forty days after launching a free pilot program for UT students with 85 new bikes to serve them, Austin B-Cycle says it’s on track to more than double the ridership of its entire 530-bike system.
Austin Active Transportation Program Manager Laura Dierenfield said 7,800 students have registered for the program so far — 15 percent of the UT campus’s entire student body.
“We were hoping for, like, 3,000 for the life of the pilot in the first 18 months,” Dierenfield said. “We had twice that in the first week.”
Students aren’t just signing up for the free program, either. They’re biking. In the program’s first 40 days, the campus bike docks averaged 12 checkouts per bike per day.
For comparison’s sake, the average New York Citi Bike is ridden five to six times per day during the spring.
“It’s been increasing in general because the weather’s getting even nicer,” Austin B-Cycle Director Elliott McFadden said. “We have 11 campus-area stations, and they are the top 11 stations in our system now.”

UT’s rapid embrace of bike sharing already puts the campus in striking distance of ridership at maybe the nation’s most successful university-linked bike share system, at North Dakota State University in Fargo, N.D. During that system’s season, its 100 bikes average 13 checkouts per day.
“We’re close to their kind of usage, and that took them about six months to get there,” McFadden said. (NDSU’s program is also free for students to join, paid for out of student services fees.)

Better than the cover of Rolling Stone

FM Matbus is this months cover feature of national Mass Transit magazine.  It’s the first time they’ve ever put two people on their cover, but they wanted to honor the way Fargo and Moorhead work together to build a more robust transit system across city and state borders.
Way to go Julie Bommelman, Lori Van Beek, Gregg Schildberger, Jim Gilmour and many others including 2.1 million riders and great drivers and support staff.
These are the people that  work everyday to make MATBUS a success along with their team of mechanics, drivers, dispatchers, and maintenance folks.  Thanks to your good work, ridership has almost tripled in the recent years!
 
Students and young people are a major reason for the growth to 2.1 million riders.  They make up over 1 million of the ridership.  They’re aware that they can save over $6,000 a year by using the bus instead of driving, not have to find a parking spot, and get picked up and dropped off nearer the door.
Here’s the full article:  http://www.masstransitmag.com/article/10848820/matbus-two-cities-operating-one-system
 
  Go green, ride with us, Matbus!!

Protecting from the river could also create a new beautiful space downtown

The cheapest protection for downtown would not likely provide the greatest community value. If we look at this protection as an opportunity to create a beautiful community space connecting downtown to the river, the best is yet to come.
Here’s a video from Todd Kurtz of Wday of last nights 5 – 0 vote to explore the technical feasibility.
 
image
Thanks to Professor Madani and these incredible young talents for sharing their visions for creating a beautiful community space in the area east of the Civic Plaza where permanent flood protection will be built.

Thanks to the 2012 NDSU 5th year Landscape Architect students shared their beautiful concepts for introducing our revitalizing downtown to the under appreciated riverfront.

 
The broadcast will also be available online at: www.cityoffargo.com/streaming

Revitalizing our city’s core is ongoing and many of the successful projects like Broadway’s redesign, new Main Ave bridge and riverfront area there were derived from community planning work in the 2002 Downtown Framework plan, 2003 Riverfront DevelopmentPlan, 2007 Framework Plan, and fits with key initiatives from 8,000 engaged citizens for Fargo GO2030 that is ongoing to implement these plans.
These pictures below are just a few examples of why we need permanent flood protection and to use this opportunity to create a beautiful new space connecting downtown to the riverfront.

We have to wait until the water rises 6′ above flood stage to even start to build this clay dike. In 2006 it was built twice.
I shot this from the top of the new main library in 2009.  The clay dike had to be fortified as it was close to failure.  We must do better

This is a large ground fault west of second street in the civic lot hat is getting worse over the years. Moving 2nd St and permanent flood protection a bit west away from the river gets to about 3′ higher ground, gives the river more capacity, and more stable ground.
This is a flood protection project in Napa, CA.  They don’t have the clay we do, so they built it close to the water

Here’s an example of another flood control project overlayed in our footprint. backing away from the river puts protection on higher ground, avoids slumping, and adds capacity.
Here’s a cool little tool you can use to zoom in and out of related images:

We have a wonderful opportunity to make this riverfront area not only permanent protection, but 2nd Ave as a wonderful gateway to the riverfront as described in the downtown 2002 Framework plan that was the basis for Broadway.  The 2003 Riverfront plan, and the 2007 Downtown framework plan all emphasize embracing the river that adds huge value.   It’s important to not just put up a bare bones “Berlin wall” to protect downtown.
Let’s build a beautiful amenity that adds aesthetically and functions as a community gathering place by backing away from the river to avoid the continuous slumping, add capacity and greenway recreation opportunities on the downtown riverfront.
 Working together and building on the many years of planning for downtown and the river,  the best is yet to come!  Mike
There are many examples of turning downtown flood protection into beautiful community gathering spaces;  The Forks in Winnipeg, The Confluence in Denver, Falls Park in Sioux Falls, Waterloo IA
Sioux Falls parkConfluence in DenverThe Forks in Winnipeg

Broadcast of NDSU Landscape Architects downtown/riverfront space Sunday at 4:30

Tune it to Fargo Cable Access Channel 12 or online streaming at 4:30 today to see 18 5th year landscape architect students as they display their concepts for connecting Downtown to the Riverfront.  The event will also be rebroadcast on Monday Dec 10 at 9 pm on Cable Access 12.
Thanks to Fargo Public Access channel 12 director Karena Carlson and producer Brian Sellin for broadcasting and recording all the presentations and making them available for more to see.  Here’s a link to the Forum article with some examples of students concepts
image
Thanks to Professor Madani and these incredible young talents for sharing their visions for creating a beautiful community space in the area east of the Civic Plaza where permanent flood protection will be built.

Thanks to the 2012 NDSU 5th year Landscape Architect students shared their beautiful concepts for introducing our revitalizing downtown to the under appreciated riverfront.

The rebroadcast times for the NDSU riverfront event is below (Cable Access Fargo channel 12).  Sunday 12-9 4:30pm and Monday 12-10 9pm
The broadcast will also be available online at: www.cityoffargo.com/streaming

Revitalizing our city’s core is ongoing and many of the successful projects like Broadway’s redesign, new Main Ave bridge and riverfront area there were derived from community planning work in the 2002 Downtown Framework plan, 2003 Riverfront DevelopmentPlan, 2007 Framework Plan, and fits with key initiatives from 8,000 engaged citizens for Fargo GO2030 that is ongoing to implement these plans.
These pictures below are just a few examples of why we need permanent flood protection and to use this opportunity to create a beautiful new space connecting downtown to the riverfront.

We have to wait until the water rises 6′ above flood stage to even start to build this clay dike. In 2006 it was built twice.
I shot this from the top of the new main library in 2009.  The clay dike had to be fortified as it was close to failure.  We must do better

This is a large ground fault west of second street in the civic lot hat is getting worse over the years. Moving 2nd St and permanent flood protection a bit west away from the river gets to about 3′ higher ground, gives the river more capacity, and more stable ground.
This is a flood protection project in Napa, CA.  They don’t have the clay we do, so they built it close to the water

Here’s an example of another flood control project overlayed in our footprint. backing away from the river puts protection on higher ground, avoids slumping, and adds capacity.
Here’s a cool little tool you can use to zoom in and out of related images:

Today could be the beginning of a beautiful relationship

Building a clay dike to protect downtown once the river is 6′ above flood stage is so 2009  Come to the Fargo Commission room 8:30 – 9:30 Friday Dec 7th, to see and visit with 18 5th year landscape architect students as they display their concepts for connecting Downtown to the Riverfront.
These young talents are sharing their visions for creating a beautiful community space in the area east of the Civic Plaza where permanent flood protection will be built.
Revitalizing our city’s core is ongoing and many of the successful projects like Broadway’s redesign, new Main Ave bridge and riverfront area there were derived from community planning work in the 2002 Downtown Framework plan, 2003 Riverfront DevelopmentPlan, 2007 Framework Plan, and Fargo GO2030 that is ongoing to implement these plans.
These pictures below are just a few examples of why we need permanent flood protection.
 

We have to wait until the water rises 6′ above flood stage to even start to build this clay dike. In 2006 it was built twice.
I shot this from the top of the new main library in 2009.  The clay dike had to be fortified as it was close to failure.  We must do better

This is a large ground fault west of second street in the civic lot hat is getting worse over the years. Moving 2nd St and permanent flood protection a bit west away from the river gets to about 3′ higher ground, gives the river more capacity, and more stable ground.
This is a flood protection project in Napa, CA.  They don’t have the clay we do, so they built it close to the water

Here’s an example of another flood control project overlayed in our footprint. backing away from the river puts protection on higher ground, avoids slumping, and adds capacity.
From: Karena Carlson
Date: December 4, 2012 1:52:28 PM CST

To: Media Contacts
Subject: NDSU Students Reveal Vision for Fargo’s Downtown Riverfront 

CFLOGONews Release
 
            Contacts:  Commissioner Mike Williams, 793-3771, mjwilliams@cityoffargo.com or NDSU landscape architecture Professor Mehran Madani, mehran.madani@ndsu.edu
 


NDSU Students Reveal Vision for Fargo’s Downtown Riverfront
 FARGO, N.D. (December 4, 2012) – Fargo City Commissioner Mike Williams would like to invite the public, as 5th year NDSU landscape architect students showcase their vision for the Fargo riverfront area and for downtown flood protection on Friday, Dec. 7, in the Commission Room at Fargo City Hall, 200 3rd St. N. The event will be broadcast live on TV Fargo 12 and online at www.cityoffargo.com/streaming.
From 8:30 – 9:30 a.m., those in attendance will learn about downtown framework plans that have been the design basis for revitalizing Broadway, the Main Avenue Bridge, the Main Library and other projects. There will also be an opportunity to visit with the 18 students presenting at the event.
From 9:30 a.m. – 3 p.m., students will present their conceptual renderings to a panel of experts for their semester grade.
– END –

NDSU Student concepts Downtown to Riverfront

Come to the Fargo Commission room 8:30 – 9:30 Friday Dec 7th, to see and visit with 18 5th year landscape architect students as they display their concepts for connecting Downtown to the Riverfront.  These young talents are sharing their visions for creating a beautiful community space in the area east of the Civic Plaza where permanent flood protection will be built.
Revitalizing our city’s core is ongoing and many of the successful projects like Broadway’s redesign, new Main Ave bridge and riverfront area there were derived from community planning work in the 2002 Downtown Framework plan, 2003 Riverfront Development Plan, 2007 Framework Plan, and Fargo GO2030 that is ongoing to implement these plans.
These pictures below are just a few examples of why we need permanent flood protection.
 

We have to wait until the water rises 6′ above flood stage to even start to build this clay dike. In 2006 it was built twice.


I shot this from the top of the new main library in 2009.  The clay dike had to be fortified as it was close to failure.  We must do better

This is a large ground fault west of second street in the civic lot hat is getting worse over the years. Moving 2nd St and permanent flood protection a bit west away from the river gets to about 3′ higher ground, gives the river more capacity, and more stable ground.


This is a flood protection project in Napa, CA.  They don’t have the clay we do, so they built it close to the water

Here’s an example of another flood control project overlayed in our footprint. backing away from the river puts protection on higher ground, avoids slumping, and adds capacity.


From: Karena Carlson
Date: December 4, 2012 1:52:28 PM CST

To: Media Contacts
Subject: NDSU Students Reveal Vision for Fargo’s Downtown Riverfront 

CFLOGONews Release
 
            Contacts:  Commissioner Mike Williams, 793-3771, mjwilliams@cityoffargo.com or NDSU landscape architecture Professor Mehran Madani, mehran.madani@ndsu.edu
 


NDSU Students Reveal Vision for Fargo’s Downtown Riverfront
 FARGO, N.D. (December 4, 2012) – Fargo City Commissioner Mike Williams would like to invite the public, as 5th year NDSU landscape architect students showcase their vision for the Fargo riverfront area and for downtown flood protection on Friday, Dec. 7, in the Commission Room at Fargo City Hall, 200 3rd St. N. The event will be broadcast live on TV Fargo 12 and online at www.cityoffargo.com/streaming.
From 8:30 – 9:30 a.m., those in attendance will learn about downtown framework plans that have been the design basis for revitalizing Broadway, the Main Avenue Bridge, the Main Library and other projects. There will also be an opportunity to visit with the 18 students presenting at the event.
From 9:30 a.m. – 3 p.m., students will present their conceptual renderings to a panel of experts for their semester grade.
– END –