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Great Rides Bikeshare Leading Austin TX and Others to Better Bike Systems

Since our Great Rides Bikeshare record breaking launch in 2015 (awarded nations most rides per bike per day three years running) we’ve met with the leaders of Bikeshare around the country at B-Cycle World and received inquiries and had discussions with cities and Universities over the years. We’ve been open and eager to share our innovative student led, easy access model.
Cool to see Austin TX is another system we’ve worked with that has adopted our model to help reduce campus congestion and add value and their ridership is exploding!
So fun to see our student led, innovative Great Rides Bikeshare model that took us from 2011 – 2014 to develop, gain student support along with strong community sponsors is now helping lead the nations bikeshares toward easier to use and more robust systems.
We’ve been delivering on the demand for sharing economy solutions to reduce transportation costs and congestion and having a positive national impact.
Let’s keep making it a Great Ride!
Mike
Here’s a quote from the article:“Some people were looking at Fargo as if is this an outlier, a one-off,” he said. “I think what we’re showing is, no, if you integrate a campus system with a larger city system — if you remove some of those barriers, this can really work.”
PlacesForBikes helps U.S. communities buil
First in a series of profiles of the Big Jump Project’s 10 focus areas. Central Austin seems to have everything: a massive research university, the world’s biggest annual media festival and one of the country’s strongest local job-creation engines. But when a city sees so much success, it runs …
peopleforbikes.org

Campus bike sharing in the United States seems to have hit a new high water mark on the flagship campus of the University of Texas.
Forty days after launching a free pilot program for UT students with 85 new bikes to serve them, Austin B-Cycle says it’s on track to more than double the ridership of its entire 530-bike system.
Austin Active Transportation Program Manager Laura Dierenfield said 7,800 students have registered for the program so far — 15 percent of the UT campus’s entire student body.
“We were hoping for, like, 3,000 for the life of the pilot in the first 18 months,” Dierenfield said. “We had twice that in the first week.”
Students aren’t just signing up for the free program, either. They’re biking. In the program’s first 40 days, the campus bike docks averaged 12 checkouts per bike per day.
For comparison’s sake, the average New York Citi Bike is ridden five to six times per day during the spring.
“It’s been increasing in general because the weather’s getting even nicer,” Austin B-Cycle Director Elliott McFadden said. “We have 11 campus-area stations, and they are the top 11 stations in our system now.”

UT’s rapid embrace of bike sharing already puts the campus in striking distance of ridership at maybe the nation’s most successful university-linked bike share system, at North Dakota State University in Fargo, N.D. During that system’s season, its 100 bikes average 13 checkouts per day.
“We’re close to their kind of usage, and that took them about six months to get there,” McFadden said. (NDSU’s program is also free for students to join, paid for out of student services fees.)

Preparing for Autonomous Vehicles

Automobiles really are becoming more automatic. Technology for driverless autos is evolving at Moores Law rates as are advances in battery technology for more cost effective electric powered cars and buses. This wave is coming, let’s be ready to ride it!

However, advances in vehicle technology will be largely wasted if we don’t plan now for ways to design our cities for people first and shared collaborative systems that feature more options for the way we move around. 
We’ll need parking during this transition, but we can double and triple the number of people living and working in our downtown focusing on designing for people first, not cars.
Quality context based mixed use neighborhoods, robust transit, bike share like Great Rides, car share, Uber, Lyft, walking are options that save people time and money while better protecting our environment.
These options add value and could benefit from autonomous driving technology requiring fewer vehicles. Some of us are already working toward establishing the infrastructure and designing our streets in a way that maximizes the savings with higher value for our citizens and community.
Road widening doesn’t work: It’s called induced demand. Here’s Honolulu
http://www.inforum.com/opinion/letters/4214873-letter-fargo-can-be-leader-alternative-energy

Fargo's first Bicnic, good family fun

Thanks to all the folks that came out for Fargo’s first Bicnic! We had folks young and not so young pedaling over to celebrate bike month and North Dakota’s and our regions first protected bike lanes. These protected lanes make biking safer and more enjoyable for people young and old.
Thanks to sponsors Great Rides, Prairie Roots Food Coop, and Union Lofts for the eats and treats. The consensus is to do it again sometime soon!

The Gates family were the first to pedal over. What a beautiful bunch!

The Gates family were the first to pedal over. What a beautiful bunch!


First family ride of the year helped us celebrate bike month and protected lanes

First family ride of the year helped us celebrate bike month and protected lanes


Thanks to Union Lofts and Jessica Berner for sharing their space for our Bicnic

Thanks to Union Lofts and Jessica Berner for sharing their space for our Bicnic


These young bicyclists pedaled over on their family ride enjoyed the new lanes and ice cream!

These young bicyclists pedaled over on their family ride enjoyed the new lanes and ice cream!


A new generation of avid bikers. Beautiful family Jen!

A new generation of avid bikers. Beautiful family Jen!


Thanks for the photo and joining the fun Bob Harris.

Thanks for the photo and joining the fun Bob Harris.


Families that bike together, have fun together

Families that bike together, have fun together


Bob Harris enjoying his first Great Rides Bike Share pedal and protected bike lanes

Bob Harris enjoying his first Great Rides Bike Share pedal and protected bike lanes


So cool to be a part of Great Rides BikeShare and the first protected bike lanes in North Dakota thanks to a lot of good work by many

So cool to be a part of Great Rides BikeShare and the first protected bike lanes in North Dakota thanks to a lot of good work by many


Completing the Protected bike lanes has already been approved for NP Ave corridor to the Red River. Meanwhile Moorhead is working on improvements for Center Avenue that may include bike lanes and the NP Avenue Bridge already has lots of room for future bike lanes.
You can share your preference whether they are on street like the ones already in place on NP between University and 10th St or at sidewalk level. They both could be colored concrete as shown here.
These colored lanes could be at sidewalk level or at street level to distinguish them

These colored lanes could be at sidewalk level or at street level to distinguish them


Take the survey here.

Let’s keep pedaling forward and Ride ON!!

Free Hot Dogs, Lemonade, Ice Cream to first 100 bicyclers

We’re celebrating May Bike Month and North Dakota’s and our regions first protected bike lanes by Union Storage on NP Ave tonight at 6:30.
Thanks to Great Rides Fargo for sponsoring the eats, and Union Lofts for the treats!!
Stir up your own smoothie with pedal power thanks to Prairie Roots Food Co-op.
Bring your bikes and cars to park on the street and pedal North Dakota’s and our regions first protected bike lanes. We’ll be set up on the east side of the Union Lofts on NP Avenue at 6:30 tonight
protected bike laneWhy protected bike lanes? It’s good for people and business to provide more safe ways to move around and help NP Avenue reach it’s great potential to be “better than Broadway”. Here’s an example from Salt Lake City https://nextcity.org/daily/entry/bike-lanes-help-salt-lake-city-economy
NP Ave protected bike laneJustin and protected lanesMuch of the progress we’ve made with walking and biking is due to Justin’s good work and other dedicated folks — with Justin Kristan at NP Avenue, Fargo North Dakota.
Completing the Protected bike lanes has already approved for NP Ave corridor to the Red River.
You can share your preference whether they are on street like the ones already in place on NP between University and 10th St or at sidewalk level. They both could be colored concrete as shown here. Take the survey here.

  • Thanks to good work by many, Fargo’s becoming a top biking city in the country. Redfin’s Bikescore ranks Fargo 28th best
  • Bicycling Magazine rates Fargo a top 50 biking city
  • Bikes for People gave us a Bike Friendly City rating.
  • Great Rides Bike Share set national use per bike records last year.IMG_6983

Let’s keep pedaling forward and Ride ON!!

Fargo's Great Rides Bike Share inspired integrated payment system

“An overlooked example of an integrated payment system already exists—in Fargo, North Dakota. And it’s created arguably one of the most successful bike share systems in the country.
Fargo’s Great Rides is an 11-station, 100-bicycle seasonal system. Its last season saw 143,000 trips and an average of six or seven rides per bike per day—more usage per bike than in New York, Washington DC or Paris.”
Ride ON! Great to see our innovative Matbus inspired, student led model for Great Rides Bike Share making such a positive national impression.

It took us about 3.5 years to get our one of a kind bike share model going, but thanks to patience, tons of homework, making the case that our unique business model for bike share can flourish here is paying off.

With just 100 bikes in 224 days 143,500 rides means

  • Great Rides has 640 check outs a day
  • over 40 rides an hour in the 16 hour daily operating period.great rides St Patricks

Thanks to our community partners and a lot of good work by many, Fargo is becoming a leader for biking and active transportation. Here’s the national article by April Corbin on the success of Great Rides Bike Share:

Why the country’s best bike share might be in Fargo

by: April Corbin, PeopleForBikes equity writer online article here

Great Ride Fargo station
Many in the bike share world are anxiously awaiting the launch of Los Angeles’ system this summer because of its ambitious transit integration plan: You’ll be able to check out a bike with the same card that gets you on a bus.
But an overlooked example of an integrated payment system already exists—in Fargo, North Dakota. And it’s created arguably one of the most successful bike share systems in the country.
Fargo’s Great Rides is an 11-station, 100-bicycle seasonal system. Its last season saw 143,000 trips and an average of six or seven rides per bike per day—more usage per bike than in New York, Washington DC or Paris.
Their primary user base: the students at North Dakota State University. Students there take approximately 90 percent of bike share trips.
It’s a model that transit, housing and social service agencies everywhere should be watching closely. Not to mention other schools.
“Our success has been in lowered barriers to entry,” explains Sara Watson Curry, the director of operations at Great Rides. “We like to say it happens ‘automagically.’ It’s really easy—less than a minute.”
A Great Rides seasonal pass is included as part of the mandatory student activities fee at NDSU. All students have to do to activate their membership is log on to the website they already use for their academic courses and university-related tasks and agree to Great Rides’ terms of service contract. Then, they can instantly check out bikes using the student ids they are already use to carrying with them.
It turns out that when you snap bike sharing into an existing system that already has a financial relationship with users and all the tools they need—and no additional sign-up cost—the results can be spectacular.
NDSU has a student population of approximately 15,000—8,000 of them have registered with Great Rides, and of those, 6,000 took at least one trip during the eight-month season.
Great Rides Fargo
“We feel strongly the integration with student IDs was key,” says Curry. “It eliminated us having to mail things and them having wait. They want to buy slices of pizza, not memberships.”
The sponsorship relationship between Great Rides and NDSU is similar to a preexisting program between the university and the local bus system that allowed students to use their school IDs to access the bus system. Students already knew about that and are using public transit to great effect, so expanding the concept to bike share was easy.
“Initially we were on campus to get people to sign up,” says Curry. “We talked to maybe 200 people over a couple of hours. From that, we saw 2,000 rides. It was a buzz that spread on campus. … They see classmates and roommates and they go wild. They get it.”
Great Rides’ popularity recalls the massively successful bike share system in Hangzhou, China, one of the world’s largest. Its users can check out one of its more than 60,000 bikes using their transit cards and get an automatic discount when they do.
Curry doesn’t see Great Rides pickup numbers as an anomaly among the bike share industry. She believes systems just need to integrate as intimately as possible.
“It was a lot of IT work and a lot of work with the university to set everything up,” says Curry, before adding that the payoff was worth it.
On their end, NDSU has included photos of bike share in their recruiting materials for potential students, and their facilities department has reported adding additional bicycle racks to accommodate the growing number of personal bicycles on campus. The university has also begun incorporating questions about bike share into their annual survey about transportation.
“It’ll be interesting to see if we move the needle,” says Curry.
Great Rides is considering expanding to service other universities in the area, but Curry notes that progress toward that goal is deliberate and not rushed. One reason the relationship with NDSU has worked so well is that student government and administration were involved and excited from the system’s inception.
“We have to build the relationship,” she says. “We need the infrastructure and the support.”
The Better Bike Share Partnership is a JPB Foundation-funded collaboration between the City of Philadelphia, the Bicycle Coalition of Greater Philadelphia, the National Association of City Transportation Officials (NACTO) and thePeopleForBikes Foundation to build equitable and replicable bike share systems.

Fargo's Great Rides Bike Share ease of use tops in the nation

Ride ON! Great to see our innovative Matbus inspired, student led model for Great Rides Bike Share making such a positive national impression.

It took us about 3.5 years to get our one of a kind bike share model going, but thanks to patience, tons of homework, making the case that our unique business model for bike share can flourish here is paying off.

With just 100 bikes in 224 days 143,500 rides means

  • Great Rides has 640 check outs a day
  • over 40 rides an hour in the 16 hour daily operating period.great rides St Patricks

Thanks to our community partners and a lot of good work by many, Fargo is becoming a leader for biking and active transportation. Here’s the national article by April Corbin on the success of Great Rides Bike Share:

Why the country’s best bike share might be in Fargo

by: April Corbin, PeopleForBikes equity writer online article here

Great Ride Fargo station
Many in the bike share world are anxiously awaiting the launch of Los Angeles’ system this summer because of its ambitious transit integration plan: You’ll be able to check out a bike with the same card that gets you on a bus.
But an overlooked example of an integrated payment system already exists—in Fargo, North Dakota. And it’s created arguably one of the most successful bike share systems in the country.
Fargo’s Great Rides is an 11-station, 100-bicycle seasonal system. Its last season saw 143,000 trips and an average of six or seven rides per bike per day—more usage per bike than in New York, Washington DC or Paris.
Their primary user base: the students at North Dakota State University. Students there take approximately 90 percent of bike share trips.
It’s a model that transit, housing and social service agencies everywhere should be watching closely. Not to mention other schools.
“Our success has been in lowered barriers to entry,” explains Sara Watson Curry, the director of operations at Great Rides. “We like to say it happens ‘automagically.’ It’s really easy—less than a minute.”
A Great Rides seasonal pass is included as part of the mandatory student activities fee at NDSU. All students have to do to activate their membership is log on to the website they already use for their academic courses and university-related tasks and agree to Great Rides’ terms of service contract. Then, they can instantly check out bikes using the student ids they are already use to carrying with them.
It turns out that when you snap bike sharing into an existing system that already has a financial relationship with users and all the tools they need—and no additional sign-up cost—the results can be spectacular.
NDSU has a student population of approximately 15,000—8,000 of them have registered with Great Rides, and of those, 6,000 took at least one trip during the eight-month season.
Great Rides Fargo
“We feel strongly the integration with student IDs was key,” says Curry. “It eliminated us having to mail things and them having wait. They want to buy slices of pizza, not memberships.”
The sponsorship relationship between Great Rides and NDSU is similar to a preexisting program between the university and the local bus system that allowed students to use their school IDs to access the bus system. Students already knew about that and are using public transit to great effect, so expanding the concept to bike share was easy.
“Initially we were on campus to get people to sign up,” says Curry. “We talked to maybe 200 people over a couple of hours. From that, we saw 2,000 rides. It was a buzz that spread on campus. … They see classmates and roommates and they go wild. They get it.”
Great Rides’ popularity recalls the massively successful bike share system in Hangzhou, China, one of the world’s largest. Its users can check out one of its more than 60,000 bikes using their transit cards and get an automatic discount when they do.
Curry doesn’t see Great Rides pickup numbers as an anomaly among the bike share industry. She believes systems just need to integrate as intimately as possible.
“It was a lot of IT work and a lot of work with the university to set everything up,” says Curry, before adding that the payoff was worth it.
On their end, NDSU has included photos of bike share in their recruiting materials for potential students, and their facilities department has reported adding additional bicycle racks to accommodate the growing number of personal bicycles on campus. The university has also begun incorporating questions about bike share into their annual survey about transportation.
“It’ll be interesting to see if we move the needle,” says Curry.
Great Rides is considering expanding to service other universities in the area, but Curry notes that progress toward that goal is deliberate and not rushed. One reason the relationship with NDSU has worked so well is that student government and administration were involved and excited from the system’s inception.
“We have to build the relationship,” she says. “We need the infrastructure and the support.”
The Better Bike Share Partnership is a JPB Foundation-funded collaboration between the City of Philadelphia, the Bicycle Coalition of Greater Philadelphia, the National Association of City Transportation Officials (NACTO) and thePeopleForBikes Foundation to build equitable and replicable bike share systems.

Fargo Great Rides Bike Share may be best in the country

Ride ON! Great to see our innovative Matbus inspired, student led model for Great Rides Bike Share making such a positive national impression.

It took us about 3.5 years to get our one of a kind bike share model going, but thanks to patience, tons of homework, making the case that our unique business model for bike share can flourish here is paying off.

With just 100 bikes in 224 days 143,500 rides means

  • Great Rides has 640 check outs a day
  • over 40 rides an hour in the 16 hour daily operating period.

Thanks to our community partners and a lot of good work by many, Fargo is becoming a leader for biking and active transportation. Here’s the national article by April Corbin on the success of Great Rides Bike Share:

Why the country’s best bike share might be in Fargo

by: April Corbin, PeopleForBikes equity writer online article here

Great Ride Fargo station
Many in the bike share world are anxiously awaiting the launch of Los Angeles’ system this summer because of its ambitious transit integration plan: You’ll be able to check out a bike with the same card that gets you on a bus.
But an overlooked example of an integrated payment system already exists—in Fargo, North Dakota. And it’s created arguably one of the most successful bike share systems in the country.
Fargo’s Great Rides is an 11-station, 100-bicycle seasonal system. Its last season saw 143,000 trips and an average of six or seven rides per bike per day—more usage per bike than in New York, Washington DC or Paris.
Their primary user base: the students at North Dakota State University. Students there take approximately 90 percent of bike share trips.
It’s a model that transit, housing and social service agencies everywhere should be watching closely. Not to mention other schools.
“Our success has been in lowered barriers to entry,” explains Sara Watson Curry, the director of operations at Great Rides. “We like to say it happens ‘automagically.’ It’s really easy—less than a minute.”
A Great Rides seasonal pass is included as part of the mandatory student activities fee at NDSU. All students have to do to activate their membership is log on to the website they already use for their academic courses and university-related tasks and agree to Great Rides’ terms of service contract. Then, they can instantly check out bikes using the student ids they are already use to carrying with them.
It turns out that when you snap bike sharing into an existing system that already has a financial relationship with users and all the tools they need—and no additional sign-up cost—the results can be spectacular.
NDSU has a student population of approximately 15,000—8,000 of them have registered with Great Rides, and of those, 6,000 took at least one trip during the eight-month season.
Great Rides Fargo
“We feel strongly the integration with student IDs was key,” says Curry. “It eliminated us having to mail things and them having wait. They want to buy slices of pizza, not memberships.”
The sponsorship relationship between Great Rides and NDSU is similar to a preexisting program between the university and the local bus system that allowed students to use their school IDs to access the bus system. Students already knew about that and are using public transit to great effect, so expanding the concept to bike share was easy.
“Initially we were on campus to get people to sign up,” says Curry. “We talked to maybe 200 people over a couple of hours. From that, we saw 2,000 rides. It was a buzz that spread on campus. … They see classmates and roommates and they go wild. They get it.”
Great Rides’ popularity recalls the massively successful bike share system in Hangzhou, China, one of the world’s largest. Its users can check out one of its more than 60,000 bikes using their transit cards and get an automatic discount when they do.
Curry doesn’t see Great Rides pickup numbers as an anomaly among the bike share industry. She believes systems just need to integrate as intimately as possible.
“It was a lot of IT work and a lot of work with the university to set everything up,” says Curry, before adding that the payoff was worth it.
On their end, NDSU has included photos of bike share in their recruiting materials for potential students, and their facilities department has reported adding additional bicycle racks to accommodate the growing number of personal bicycles on campus. The university has also begun incorporating questions about bike share into their annual survey about transportation.
“It’ll be interesting to see if we move the needle,” says Curry.
Great Rides is considering expanding to service other universities in the area, but Curry notes that progress toward that goal is deliberate and not rushed. One reason the relationship with NDSU has worked so well is that student government and administration were involved and excited from the system’s inception.
“We have to build the relationship,” she says. “We need the infrastructure and the support.”
The Better Bike Share Partnership is a JPB Foundation-funded collaboration between the City of Philadelphia, the Bicycle Coalition of Greater Philadelphia, the National Association of City Transportation Officials (NACTO) and thePeopleForBikes Foundation to build equitable and replicable bike share systems.

Sandy's Donuts, more Sandy's Donuts, hot cocoa, to celebrate Fargo's evolving transportation options

Now that got your attention! Swing by the Fargo Public Library’s community room Tuesday November 24th at 1:30 p.m.. We’ll learn about and celebrate the many new ways to get around town, user friendly parking info and tools, housing tips and programs, and the positive impact Great Rides Bikeshare has made and how they’re all related.
You’ll also get a chance to look and step inside a super cool new sixty foot articulated bus being demonstrated at this event. This bus is being delivered to San Francisco. New Flyer’s are made in St. Cloud and use several components made right here in Fargo!newflyer_xcelsior_xn60
In one short hour, we’ll hear quick hitting updates from experts like:
 

  • Jeremy Gorden Fargo Traffic Engineer will talk about complete streets and the first protected bike lanes in Fargo and North Dakota. The progress with more on street bike facilities has helped increase number of people biking and fewer bike related accidents. NP Ave protected bike lane
  • Sara Watson Curry of Great Rides Bikeshare will talk about their national record setting, matbus inspired, student led business model and how it works. Great Rides kicked off with a grand entrance at this years St. Patricks Day parade on a 70 degree day on March 15th with over 17,000 happy folks

Great Rides at St. Patty's 2015
Just in the past year, all these cool new options to get around town.
Thanks to good work by many, Fargo’s added several new options for the way we move around our community with expanding transit, the fun, fast, and free Link FM, Great Rides BikeshareUber Fargo, and Fargo’s and North Dakota’s first protected bike lanes all just in the last 9 months.
These improvements and continuing to focus on infill, complete streets, and mixed use will make them even more efficient and easy to use.
Hope to see you on Tuesday!
cropped-space-required-to-transport-60-people.jpg
 
 
 

Where are folks moving to from the Twin Cities? US Census says……….Fargo!

No surprise to some of us that have seen these trends evolving as we become a more active, attractive, diverse, and interesting community! We’re not only attracting people and talent from the Twin Cities, but several other counties spread around the US.
In several earlier posts, Fargo has received high marks for quality of life. One of my favorites is this “Best places for 20 somethings” 
Here’s a recent article in Minnesota Public Radio ~
“Outside the state of Minnesota, the biggest net recipient of Hennepin County residents was not Maricopa County, Arizona (Phoenix), not Harris County, Texas (Houston), not Broward County, Florida. It was Cass County, N.D., home of Fargo.
You can see these net gain and loss population statistics with this cool tool from the Census using the Census Flows Mapper. Click on any county in the country and see where everybody’s going.

http://blogs.mprnews.org/ground-level/2014/02/where-did-everybody-go-literally/

~ End MPR article ~
We also have more folks choosing to build their lives in our Fargo area like the 143 people that moved here from Washington County Oregon, and 90 from Weld County Colorado for example.
The trend of outmigration has changed 180 degrees over the past decade. At the last Commission meeting, I mentioned some of these very positive changes from our area students to Jim Gartin of the FM EDC.
In annual Fargo Public Schools surveys asking students if they plan to stay in the Fargo area, the student responses have changed from about 35% 8 years ago saying they want to build their life here, to now around 65% with more wanting to live, work, learn, and play in our region.
Our culture is evolving and we’re becoming a more active and interesting community where people can engage and reach our potential.
It’s fun to see people realize our excellent quality of life and the many opportunities to dream and work together as we design our community for happiness.
Let’s keep growing well!
 

Where are the folks moving to from the Twin Cities? Census says………Fargo!

No surprise to some of us that have seen these trends evolving as we become a more active, attractive, diverse, and interesting community! We’re not only attracting people and talent from the Twin Cities, but several other counties spread around the US.
In several earlier posts, Fargo has received high marks for quality of life. One of my favorites is this “Best places for 20 somethings” 
Here’s a recent article in Minnesota Public Radio ~
“Outside the state of Minnesota, the biggest net recipient of Hennepin County residents was not Maricopa County, Arizona (Phoenix), not Harris County, Texas (Houston), not Broward County, Florida. It was Cass County, N.D., home of Fargo.
You can see these net gain and loss population statistics with this cool tool from the Census using the Census Flows Mapper. Click on any county in the country and see where everybody’s going.

http://blogs.mprnews.org/ground-level/2014/02/where-did-everybody-go-literally/

~ End MPR article ~

We also have more folks choosing to build their lives in our Fargo area like the 143 people that moved here from Washington County Oregon, and 90 from Weld County Colorado for example.
The trend of outmigration has changed 180 degrees over the past decade. At the last Commission meeting, I mentioned some of these very positive changes from our area students to Jim Gartin of the FM EDC.
In annual  Fargo Public Schools survey students asking if they plan to stay in the Fargo area. Those surveys have changed from about 35% 8 years ago saying they want to build their life here, to now around 65% with more wanting to live, work, learn, and play in our region.
Our culture is evolving and we’re becoming a more active and interesting community where people can engage and reach our potential.
It’s fun to see people realize our excellent quality of life and the many opportunities to dream and work together as we design our community for happiness.
Let’s keep growing well!